Posted in Art in Nature, Graphic Design, Photography by Brittany on April 16th, 2014
 

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Depending on our expertise, we all see the world differently. As a graphic designer, Victoria Siemer sees the possibilities of manipulation within that world. As such, she has taken to adjusting images to reflect certain moods, thoughts, and feelings.

In the end they each express something different, and seemingly profound.

On first glance you would think there was a large mirror placed in the middle of the landscape, but upon further examination you can see that each of the images has a piece that has been highlighted, duplicated, reflected or adjusted in some way. The tricks these images play on your brain are interesting, and each one has a slightly different adjustment.

More of her work can be seen on her blog, and she follows a similar trend within her work but each series and each piece varies in some way.

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

Graphic Designer Victoria Siemer Creates Adjusted Realities

If you’re a fan of abstract art, you’ll love DNA 11!

Via Colossal

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Photography by Brittany on April 15th, 2014
 

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

It isn’t a new notion to focus on insects and water droplets and all things tiny when delving into the world of macro photography. However, Ukrainian photographer Vyacheslav Mishchenko has revealed a new world to us through his macro photography: the world of snails.

His photographs seem to convey a quiet, peaceful and slow-moving world that we humans are just too big to understand. These delicate moments are captured in some of the most bright and colorful scenery. It’s almost as if these images are straight out of a fairytale movie.

Take a look at some of the moments Mishchenko has captured below, and try to imagine the moments in that snail’s daily life that you are witnessing.

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

 

Macro Photography Reveals the Intimate World of Snails

 

Via Demilked

 

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Inspiration, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on April 12th, 2014
 

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

We know that as humans on Earth our lives are a constant combination of organization and chaos. What we can’t always see, is the bigger picture.

Photographer Alex MacLean has taken it upon himself to capture just that. Leaning out of the window of an airplane, high above the organization, chaos, or organized chaos — as the case may be — he snaps photographs of the patterns, symmetry and asymmetry that our lives cause and create.

And the resulting images are what you see here.

MacLean is a pilot and a photographer, with a background in architecture. All of these elements of his amazing lifestyle are visible in his images, and seem to contribute to the way he sees and composes his shots. See more the collision of natural and constructed in his images below.

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

To see more of the natural patterns humans create, check out DNA and Fingerprint Art!

Via Wired

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Cool Art Ideas, Inspiration, Photography by Brittany on April 8th, 2014
 

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

Sometimes all you need is a new way to look at your everyday surroundings. That is what photographer Bing Wright has accomplished with his series Broken Mirror/Evening Sky.

These images have the look of stained glass, and each one captures a different color combination and pattern – depending on where the cracks in the mirror break up the sky. It is a unique way to present something that we can see almost every day and it is visually captivating.

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

Shattered Mirror Photographic Series

If you love unique artwork, check out our Fingerprint Portraits!

Via Colossal

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Photography by Brittany on April 3rd, 2014
 

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

We’ve all seen water droplet photography, and the unique shapes you can capture at high speeds when dealing with liquid. But this photo series by Jack Long presents these shots in a new way.

He calls the series River Giants. When you look at the images, no doubt the first thing that comes to mind is that these water shapes look a lot like jelly fish — or at least some sort of ocean creature. Long has perfected the timing of these shots to be sure to capture the shapes of these giants.

No two could ever be the same, but with the variety of colors and shapes Long has certainly put together an awesome series of giants to fear next time you’re down by the river!

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

River Giants: A Photographic Series by Jack Long

Love unique art? Check out DNA 11!

Via My Modern Met

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Photography, Science by Brittany on April 1st, 2014
 

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

We are always fascinated by artistic studies that investigate the science behind humans. This photographic series does just that.

Photographer Gao Rongguo took photographs of 50-year-old twins standing face-to-face, to show the similarities and differences of how we age. From their physical features, to the differences in their hair styles and wardrobe, these photos provide a contrasting look at the way life changes people.

As if looking into a mirror, Rongguo says the portraits were set up to show how “He/she used to have the same face, living in the same family, but their lives changed due to various reasons after growing up.”

Take a look at some more twins below!

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Via Mashable  

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 29th, 2014
 

Typographic Desks

On our theme of typography this week, we’ve found another unique place to incorporate words and letters.

Discovered on Benoit Challand‘s portfolio, Fold Yard desks would be the perfect addition to any company’s office. Even if you aren’t involved with design, you can appreciate these typographic desks as an alternative to the regular cubicle lifestyle!

Your desk could be its own unique shape, plus be part of a curated layout – for instance a letter of the company name, or each employee’s initial. The possibilities are endless!

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

If you like unique design, check out DNA 11!

Via Web Urbanist

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Cool Art Ideas, DNA Art, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on March 27th, 2014
 

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light painting has been around for years and it takes a special artist to be able to put a new spin on the technique. Which is exactly what Patrick Rochon has done.

These images were created based on invisible realities. As Rochon explains, “I’ve been fascinated by what we can’t see. Like the shape of sounds, energy, vibrations, feelings, the photons our bodies emits. Light is invisible until it touches something. Vibrations made by our voices have the most intricate shapes as we can see with cymatics.”

So he took this fascination and worked on this series to depict these realities. He says he works in complete darkness to create the images, and uses music to let his body and the sound move him (internally and externally).

This series is currently on display in Calgary, Canada but can be seen on his website as well.

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Art created within our personal realities is our specialty. Check out DNA, Fingerprint and Kiss portraits here.

Via PetaPixel

 

 
 
 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on March 25th, 2014
 

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

No matter what you put under a microscope, it’s going to look a little strange. From something as simple as a lily (above) to something as in-depth as the wiring of the human brain, microscopic photographs let us see the colors, textures, pores and bumps that we can’t see with our own eyes alone. And it is eerily fascinating.

The Wellcome Image Awards are a competition for just such photos, and we have some of the winners for you to take a look at here. A lot of the images were taken using a technique called Electron Microscopy. This is a process to capture an image with a beam of electrons, rather than a beam of light. The electrons interact with the subject to create the image we see in the end.

Some other techniques used in creating these images include X-ray projection, light micrographs and standard photography, among others.

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Wiring of a Human Brain

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Nit on Human Hair

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Bat

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Vitamin C Crystals

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Plant Reproductive Parts

Something else you can’t see with your own eyes alone is how awesome our human DNA is! Check out our DNA Portraits to see the art you can create from your own science.

Via Wired Science

 
 
 
 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on March 22nd, 2014
 

Ice Typography

We are big fans of typography (don’t believe us? Just check out our Pinterest account).

If you’re with us on that, you’ll love this ice typography by Nicole Dextras! It is exactly what you think, words written with letters made from ice. What makes it extra cool is that the words suit the locations, and the locations range from the Yukon River to downtown Toronto.

As well, the letters are 3D, different colors, and vary in size from 8 feet tall to 18 inches tall. Visit her website to learn more about the process she took to create her typography!

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

If you love the combination of nature, science, and art, you may want to check out our art — created from your DNA!

Via Design Collector

 
 
 
 
Looking for corporate art? Create a photo canvas for your office: Visit our sister site CanvasPop.