Archive for March, 2014
 
Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 29th, 2014
 

Typographic Desks

On our theme of typography this week, we’ve found another unique place to incorporate words and letters.

Discovered on Benoit Challand‘s portfolio, Fold Yard desks would be the perfect addition to any company’s office. Even if you aren’t involved with design, you can appreciate these typographic desks as an alternative to the regular cubicle lifestyle!

Your desk could be its own unique shape, plus be part of a curated layout – for instance a letter of the company name, or each employee’s initial. The possibilities are endless!

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

If you like unique design, check out DNA 11!

Via Web Urbanist

 
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Posted in Cool Art Ideas, DNA Art, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on March 27th, 2014
 

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light painting has been around for years and it takes a special artist to be able to put a new spin on the technique. Which is exactly what Patrick Rochon has done.

These images were created based on invisible realities. As Rochon explains, “I’ve been fascinated by what we can’t see. Like the shape of sounds, energy, vibrations, feelings, the photons our bodies emits. Light is invisible until it touches something. Vibrations made by our voices have the most intricate shapes as we can see with cymatics.”

So he took this fascination and worked on this series to depict these realities. He says he works in complete darkness to create the images, and uses music to let his body and the sound move him (internally and externally).

This series is currently on display in Calgary, Canada but can be seen on his website as well.

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Light Paintings Based on That Which Can be Heard or Felt but not Seen

Art created within our personal realities is our specialty. Check out DNA, Fingerprint and Kiss portraits here.

Via PetaPixel

 

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on March 25th, 2014
 

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

No matter what you put under a microscope, it’s going to look a little strange. From something as simple as a lily (above) to something as in-depth as the wiring of the human brain, microscopic photographs let us see the colors, textures, pores and bumps that we can’t see with our own eyes alone. And it is eerily fascinating.

The Wellcome Image Awards are a competition for just such photos, and we have some of the winners for you to take a look at here. A lot of the images were taken using a technique called Electron Microscopy. This is a process to capture an image with a beam of electrons, rather than a beam of light. The electrons interact with the subject to create the image we see in the end.

Some other techniques used in creating these images include X-ray projection, light micrographs and standard photography, among others.

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Wiring of a Human Brain

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Nit on Human Hair

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Bat

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Vitamin C Crystals

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Plant Reproductive Parts

Something else you can’t see with your own eyes alone is how awesome our human DNA is! Check out our DNA Portraits to see the art you can create from your own science.

Via Wired Science

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on March 22nd, 2014
 

Ice Typography

We are big fans of typography (don’t believe us? Just check out our Pinterest account).

If you’re with us on that, you’ll love this ice typography by Nicole Dextras! It is exactly what you think, words written with letters made from ice. What makes it extra cool is that the words suit the locations, and the locations range from the Yukon River to downtown Toronto.

As well, the letters are 3D, different colors, and vary in size from 8 feet tall to 18 inches tall. Visit her website to learn more about the process she took to create her typography!

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

If you love the combination of nature, science, and art, you may want to check out our art — created from your DNA!

Via Design Collector

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on March 18th, 2014
 

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

Photographer Phillip Stearns took the notion that the camera is an extension of the eye and applied it literally to this photographic series.

He took household chemicals such as bleach, vinegar, baking soda, and rubbing alcohol and applied them to instant color film. These chemicals, combined with exposure and some 15,000 volts of alternating current, create these layered and detailed patterns across the film.

Stearns says of the final product, “I find it curious and exhilarating that the impressions left behind after developing these extreme exposures so perfectly resemble networks of blood vessels in the retina.” And we can’t help but agree — something that so resembles a science experiment produces such beautiful images and colors.

Take a look at a few more images below!

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

 

If you love science and art, you’ll love art created from your DNA at DNA 11.

Via Ignant

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool by Brittany on March 15th, 2014
 

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

There isn’t much we can say (or need to) about these anatomical collages by Travis Bedel other than, “Wow.”

These images are created by cutting and pasting vintage artworks onto anatomical, biological and botanical images and illustrations. We are continuously surprised and impressed by the ways that science and art can be combined.

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

 

If you like artwork made from science, check out how you can create art from your DNA!

Via Colossal

 
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What Could be Better Than Camping in a Treehouse?

Okay, maybe not what you would picture for traditional camping, but it still counts.

This treehouse, designed by Farrow Partnership Architects, is intended to be one of 12 houses installed in an eco-resort near Toronto, Canada. They are open concept, so that you are one with nature, but still sheltered so that you can have the luxury of a 5-star resort while “camping.”

And that’s not all — they are also environmentally friendly so that the trees that support them are not strained or damaged. The houses are suspended from many branches above, rather than having all the weight on the trunk or using braces from the ground (cheating, for a “tree house”).

Check out the images below to see more of the amazing interior and functional design!

What Could be Better Than Camping in a Treehouse?

What Could be Better Than Camping in a Treehouse?

 

What Could be Better Than Camping in a Treehouse?

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Via WebUbanist

 

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 8th, 2014
 

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Dopamine is something we’ve all had experience with, whether we realized what it was called or not. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that releases chemicals and transmits information in your brain, primarily when something good or rewarding happens.

To (over)simplify, it is the happiness neurotransmitter.

A Form of Happiness — The above wooden model — is the physical chemical compound strand and it was designed by Jessica Charlesworth and Tim Parsons. Aside from the fact that this model physically represents an amazing and important scientific property, it is also beautifully designed. From the box, to the raw wood of the neurotransmitter pieces, to magnetic functionality of the parts it is sleek and intriguing.

The kit also comes with more of an explanation on the process and physical forms that dopamine takes when it is released so that you can learn while you “play”. Check out the photos below to see more of the amazing design.

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

If you love when science and art collide, check out DNA 11!

Via Art & Science Journal

 
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Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 5th, 2014
 

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

Sleeping outside, under the starry skies, is something that many of us dream of doing. Although it is not always possible, for where can you lay peacefully and guarantee to see the beauty of the stars, let alone have appropriate temperatures to do so? Now there is a place to do so — in your bedroom!

The egg-shaped Cosmos Bed was designed by Natalia Rumyantseva and is still in prototype stage. Not only does it provide the illusion of sleeping beneath open skies, it is also equipped with a built-in audio system to play music, white-noise and your alarm in the morning. Plus, it has an aroma dispenser to provide you with therapeutic scents as you dream.

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

 

If you love unique products for your home, check out our wall art!

Via FastCo Design

 
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Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Home Decor, Just Cool by Brittany on March 1st, 2014
 

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

We’ve noticed a trend, and we’re quite fond it. Nothing is as sleek and geometrically intricate as origami — the Japanese art of paper folding — so how could you go wrong with a design based on it? We’ve noticed a lot of origami inspired products and designs lately so we rounded up a few of our favourites to admire and praise.

1) The Origami Bench

5 Origami Inspired Designs

Created by blackLAB architects, this bench combines clean white with exposed wood and metal. Plus it folds and creases as seamlessly as paper.

2) Make Kiosks

5 Origami Inspired Designs

Make Architects created these kiosks based on the efficient and functional concept of folding paper. They open to reveal the kiosk inside and close to become sculpture-like when not in use.

3) Kafolda: a Fold-it-Yourself Spoon

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

This spoon is mailed to you flat. You are in charge of folding it into the perfect shape — with crisp corners to reach right to the edges of a flat container.

4) Klemens Torggler Doors

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

These doors fold and rotate to open and close, looking as light as paper.

5) Folded Tones Rug

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

This rug does not actually fold or bend like origami, but it sure looks like it does. An optical illusion for your floor!

Let us know which one of our 5 Origami-Inspired Designs you like best in the comments!
If you’re looking for  unique designs to decorate your home, check out our DNA Art! 

 
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Looking for corporate art? Create a photo canvas for your office: Visit our sister site CanvasPop.