Archive for the ‘Art+Science’ Category
 
 

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This table glows in the dark. And although the final product looks like something you would see in a design showroom, or modern house magazine, it is actually something that came from a DIY project — one that you could even do yourself.

Artist/inventor Mike Warren created this table using photoluminescent (glow) powder and clear resin, to fill the cracks of a naturally porous piece of wood. The result is a table that will charge in sunlight and glow blue, only in the cracks and spaces filled with the glow resin.

Check out the video below to see how it works and how it was made. If you want to attempt this yourself, follow the instructions on Instructables and be sure to send us a photo of the result!

 

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Via Colossal

If you like to fill your home with unique art projects, why not create a DNA Portrait?

 

 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on September 18th, 2014
 

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We’ve featured close-up photographs of diatoms before, and as explained these images are microscopic photographs of algae. The patterns and colors created from the smallest organisms on earth are astounding.

But saying that they are microscopic photographs doesn’t really explain — how did the scientists and artists capture these amazing images?

Klaus Kemp is here to explain it for us. The video below gives us some insight into his studies and artwork, as diatoms have been his professional and artistic focus for many years.

The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.

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For more artwork with unique patterns and color, check out DNA 11!

Via Colossal

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on July 30th, 2014
 

At first glance you would think that these spiders have been turned into a walking art project, but in fact they are naturally decorated with the sequin-esque reflective pieces on their backs.

These spiders are appropriately called mirrored, or sequined spiders and they can actually change the size of the reflective patches, depending on if they are on the move or at rest, threatened or relaxed.

Venture over to photographer Nicky Bay’s website to see some more (and less pretty) macro shots of spiders.

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Via Bored Panda

If you love finding art within nature too, check out DNA 11 to see how art occurs naturally in your DNA and Fingerprints!

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on July 16th, 2014
 

Microscopic Paintings

These images look like fine art paintings – but they’re not. They’re actually made from layers of microscopic images.

Artist Rebecca Clews takes hundreds of microscopic images, and combines them until they create a final work she is happy with. Many of the color and texture combinations look like abstract landscapes that reflect her growing up in rural New Mexico. The microscopes became a fixture in her work through school, and her parents background as scientists.

Take a look at some of the amazing work she has created, piece by piece.

Microscopic Paintings

Microscopic Paintings

Microscopic Paintings

Microscopic Paintings

Microscopic Paintings

Via My Modern Met

If you like the combination of science and art, check out how to make your own with DNA 11.

 
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What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

We’re always looking for new ways to create personalized art, so we thought we would share our recent research with you!

We have been looking at a way to create jewellery, from your DNA. The possibilities are endless with this idea, so the process was exciting.

First we took a look at whether we would use the same sequencing procedure as we do with our portraits. We wanted to stay true to our DNA 11 customers and products, but we thought there might be some other interesting patterns in the science that we could work with. We took a look at STR data, to see if it would translate well onto a ring, bracelet, or even necklace.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

The numbers in the data would transfer well into measurements of the bands, providing a delicate and perfectly unique pattern for each piece.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

Another way we could go about it would be to use our original sequencing, and transfer the entire portrait, or a single ladder onto the piece.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

We decided to focus on the idea of a DNA ring. Outside of the DNA data possibilities, there are so many options in the world of jewellery that we have looked at. From the size and design of the piece, to the type of material used, to the way they are physically produced, there is so much to take into consideration. We tried a few 3D-printed prototypes and even discussed with a local jeweller the possibilities of casting each ring.

We started with the above sketches and created some potential digital designs.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

 

Once we saw how the bands could look, we moved forward with 3D printed prototypes.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

We played around with silver, gold and titanium options.

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

We also looked at cutting out the DNA data, compared to raising it above the surface, or etching the full portrait into the ring. The ways of personalizing these pieces never ends!

What's Brewing in the DNA 11 Labs

If you’re familiar with our DNA Portraits, you’ll see the full banding etched into the ring in the above photo!

We’ll keep working on these ideas and let you know what we come up with! In the meantime, let us know what you think or if you have any ideas for cool DNA Art in the comments!

 

 
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Posted in Art+Science, How it's Made, Just Cool, Science by Brittany on May 27th, 2014
 

We’ve always highlighted works of art that collide with the world of science — this work takes that collision to a whole new level.

These portraits are made from disease-causing bacteria. Artist/Scientist Zachary Copfer used different types of bacteria for the different portraits, including that which causes respiratory infections and even some from his own body!

The portraits themselves are quite impressive, outside of the medium used to create them. The way Copfer exposes the bacteria to radiation in order to accelerate their growth causes a Lichtenstein appearance in the work as well — the spots of bacteria resembling the comic book style Lichtenstein was known for.

The other thing about creating art from bacteria is that these cells are living things, which means they will eventually die. These works of art are mortal beings.

Wow.

Love science and art? Check out DNA 11! 

Via Beautiful/Decay

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on May 13th, 2014
 

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

When you think of mushrooms — or fungi — the first thought that comes to mind is not usually how beautiful, or pretty, or fascinating they are. Generally fungus is associated, to no fault of its own, with negative thoughts like gross or weird.

Steve Axford has changed that.

A photographer based  in Australia, Axford has captured some rare and undiscovered types of mushrooms. The colors, textures and overall images are so pleasing to look at that you would never think the subject was fungi. Ranging from temperate fungi (well-known) to tropical fungi (not-so-well-documented) Axford seeks out the most intriguing, visually and scientifically, animals, plants and people to photograph.

We think he’s done an amazing job with this series, check out his Flickr for even more photos.

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

Photographer Steve Axford makes Mushrooms look Beautiful

If you love science and art, check out our DNA Art!

Via Colossal

 
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Posted in Art+Science, DNA Art, Science by Brittany on April 25th, 2014
 

To celebrate, we wanted to share some things you might not know about DNA!

And take 20% off artwork made from your DNA  - use the promo code DNADAY
(not combinable with other discounts or promotions, valid through April 27, 2014)

National DNA Day

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on April 24th, 2014
 

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

These X-ray images reveal the tiny details within nature. As a physicist, Arie van’t Riet specialized in radiation and low energy X-rays and eventually turned this part of his profession into an artistic hobby.

The stunning black and white images are first taken using X-ray technology, and afterwards he fills in the color using photoshop, as he sees fit. The combination and contrast between the X-ray image and the color is eye-catching and interesting. Van’t Riet says that approaching an image opportunity, “Each time it is challenging me to arrive at an X-ray photograph that represents the sentiment of the scene.”

Take a look at the colorful, yet black and white images below and let us know what you think! If you like this work, stop by DNA 11 to some more science-based art!

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Physicist Takes X-Ray Photographs of Plants and Animals

Via Fstoppers

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on April 18th, 2014
 

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

We love the intersection of science and art and that is exactly what this photography series by Rachel Sussman is all about.

These photographs capture some of the oldest living things in the world. As she explains in her TED talk, Sussman has been working for nearly a decade to research and track down these organisms, and it will take her about two more to track down the rest and complete the series.

The organisms included range from 2,000 years old (brain coral in Tobago) to 80,000 years old (aspens in Utah) to 400,000 years old (actinobacteria in soil from Copenhagen).

Check out some more of the oldest living things in the world below!

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and ArtPhotography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Via Brain Pickings

 
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