Archive for the ‘Art+Science’ Category
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on April 18th, 2014
 

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

We love the intersection of science and art and that is exactly what this photography series by Rachel Sussman is all about.

These photographs capture some of the oldest living things in the world. As she explains in her TED talk, Sussman has been working for nearly a decade to research and track down these organisms, and it will take her about two more to track down the rest and complete the series.

The organisms included range from 2,000 years old (brain coral in Tobago) to 80,000 years old (aspens in Utah) to 400,000 years old (actinobacteria in soil from Copenhagen).

Check out some more of the oldest living things in the world below!

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Photography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and ArtPhotography Series of the Oldest Living Things Combines Science and Art

Via Brain Pickings

 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Inspiration, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on April 12th, 2014
 

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

We know that as humans on Earth our lives are a constant combination of organization and chaos. What we can’t always see, is the bigger picture.

Photographer Alex MacLean has taken it upon himself to capture just that. Leaning out of the window of an airplane, high above the organization, chaos, or organized chaos — as the case may be — he snaps photographs of the patterns, symmetry and asymmetry that our lives cause and create.

And the resulting images are what you see here.

MacLean is a pilot and a photographer, with a background in architecture. All of these elements of his amazing lifestyle are visible in his images, and seem to contribute to the way he sees and composes his shots. See more the collision of natural and constructed in his images below.

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

Aerial Photographs Show the Collison of Natural and Constructed That We Create

To see more of the natural patterns humans create, check out DNA and Fingerprint Art!

Via Wired

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Photography, Science by Brittany on April 1st, 2014
 

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

We are always fascinated by artistic studies that investigate the science behind humans. This photographic series does just that.

Photographer Gao Rongguo took photographs of 50-year-old twins standing face-to-face, to show the similarities and differences of how we age. From their physical features, to the differences in their hair styles and wardrobe, these photos provide a contrasting look at the way life changes people.

As if looking into a mirror, Rongguo says the portraits were set up to show how “He/she used to have the same face, living in the same family, but their lives changed due to various reasons after growing up.”

Take a look at some more twins below!

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Via Mashable  

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on March 25th, 2014
 

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

No matter what you put under a microscope, it’s going to look a little strange. From something as simple as a lily (above) to something as in-depth as the wiring of the human brain, microscopic photographs let us see the colors, textures, pores and bumps that we can’t see with our own eyes alone. And it is eerily fascinating.

The Wellcome Image Awards are a competition for just such photos, and we have some of the winners for you to take a look at here. A lot of the images were taken using a technique called Electron Microscopy. This is a process to capture an image with a beam of electrons, rather than a beam of light. The electrons interact with the subject to create the image we see in the end.

Some other techniques used in creating these images include X-ray projection, light micrographs and standard photography, among others.

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Wiring of a Human Brain

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Nit on Human Hair

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Bat

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Vitamin C Crystals

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Plant Reproductive Parts

Something else you can’t see with your own eyes alone is how awesome our human DNA is! Check out our DNA Portraits to see the art you can create from your own science.

Via Wired Science

 
 
Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on March 22nd, 2014
 

Ice Typography

We are big fans of typography (don’t believe us? Just check out our Pinterest account).

If you’re with us on that, you’ll love this ice typography by Nicole Dextras! It is exactly what you think, words written with letters made from ice. What makes it extra cool is that the words suit the locations, and the locations range from the Yukon River to downtown Toronto.

As well, the letters are 3D, different colors, and vary in size from 8 feet tall to 18 inches tall. Visit her website to learn more about the process she took to create her typography!

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

If you love the combination of nature, science, and art, you may want to check out our art — created from your DNA!

Via Design Collector

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on March 18th, 2014
 

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

Photographer Phillip Stearns took the notion that the camera is an extension of the eye and applied it literally to this photographic series.

He took household chemicals such as bleach, vinegar, baking soda, and rubbing alcohol and applied them to instant color film. These chemicals, combined with exposure and some 15,000 volts of alternating current, create these layered and detailed patterns across the film.

Stearns says of the final product, “I find it curious and exhilarating that the impressions left behind after developing these extreme exposures so perfectly resemble networks of blood vessels in the retina.” And we can’t help but agree — something that so resembles a science experiment produces such beautiful images and colors.

Take a look at a few more images below!

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

High-Voltage Photographs Resemble Blood Vessels in the Retina

 

If you love science and art, you’ll love art created from your DNA at DNA 11.

Via Ignant

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool by Brittany on March 15th, 2014
 

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

There isn’t much we can say (or need to) about these anatomical collages by Travis Bedel¬†other than, “Wow.”

These images are created by cutting and pasting vintage artworks onto anatomical, biological and botanical images and illustrations. We are continuously surprised and impressed by the ways that science and art can be combined.

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collage Art by Travis Bedel

 

If you like artwork made from science, check out how you can create art from your DNA!

Via Colossal

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Cool Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 8th, 2014
 

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Dopamine is something we’ve all had experience with, whether we realized what it was called or not. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that releases chemicals¬†and transmits information in your brain, primarily when something good or rewarding happens.

To (over)simplify, it is the happiness neurotransmitter.

A Form of Happiness — The above wooden model — is the physical chemical compound strand and it was designed by Jessica Charlesworth and Tim Parsons. Aside from the fact that this model physically represents an amazing and important scientific property, it is also beautifully designed. From the box, to the raw wood of the neurotransmitter pieces, to magnetic functionality of the parts it is sleek and intriguing.

The kit also comes with more of an explanation on the process and physical forms that dopamine takes when it is released so that you can learn while you “play”. Check out the photos below to see more of the amazing design.

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

Tangible Happiness: A Wooden Model of Dopamine

If you love when science and art collide, check out DNA 11!

Via Art & Science Journal

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on February 27th, 2014
 

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

It’s no surprise that we enjoy the combination of science and art¬†¬†and these images by¬†Fabian Oefner¬†are exactly that. Oefner comes from an art and design background but has always been interested in science. His images generally depict a scientific concept, however you don’t need to know the scientific background to see the beauty in his images.

As he explains in his TED talk¬†the goal of his work is to speak to the viewer’s heart as well as their brain. For instance, the image above is created with ferrofluid which is a magnetic substance. After placing a magnet beneath the fluid and adding watercolor paint to the substance you can see the patterns and shapes begin to form. You don’t need to know that ferrofluid is hydrophobic (it won’t mix with water) to see that this image is stunning, but when you do know that the details in the image become much more evident.

Check out a few of his other images below to see the many ways science and art can collide.

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

If you love science check out our DNA Art! 

Via TED Blog

 

 
 
Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on February 22nd, 2014
 

Paint on a Speaker Makes 3D Pollock-Style Photos

It’s no surprise that we are fans of color. So when we saw these photographs by Martin Klimas¬†we just had to share them!

These colorful creations were made by putting globs of paint onto a scrim which was placed over a speaker. Klimas then turned up the volume on a carefully selected track and captured the paint being tossed and thrown by the beat of the music.

It took him over 1000 shots to perfect his series, but we feel it was well worth it.

Paint on a Speaker Makes 3D Pollock-Style Photos

Paint on a Speaker Makes 3D Pollock-Style Photos

Paint on a Speaker Makes 3D Pollock-Style Photos

Paint on a Speaker Makes 3D Pollock-Style Photos

Love cool art ideas? Check out our DNA Art!

Via Lost At E Minor

 
 
 
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