Archive for the ‘Art+Science’ Category
 
Posted in Art+Science, International, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on January 4th, 2013
 

This installation may be art + science at it’s finest! We’re amazed at how innovative, and unique this idea is — to see it in person would be truly thrilling. These photos were created by Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde, and are a part of his Nimbus series. Here’s some more information behind the photos, via Colossal:

Smilde’s methods … are less mythic and more practical, instead relying on delicate balance of smoke, moisture and light. Of course science alone doesn’t account for the striking visual impact contained in each image, as the artist carefully selects the perfect location for the creation of each cloud and then painstakingly lights it from behind for the desired effect. Via email Smilde tells me that it can take quite a while to get all of the elements in place for each cloud and that the installation is so fleeting, the use of photography is critical in capturing the split second where everything becomes perfect.

Smilde has three upcoming exhibitions this year including Ronchini Gallery in London from January 16 through February 16, the SFAC Galleries in San Francisco from February through April, and at Land of Tomorrow in Louisville, Kentucky also from February through April.

If you’re looking to create your own personal work of art, check out our unique portrait ideas that also combine science and art.

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Cool Design of the Week, Just Cool by Courtney on December 14th, 2012
 

Have you ever seen such an amazing display of craftsmanship, art, and science? This stunning woodcut print called “The Moon” is currently being produced by Tugboat Printshop — a shop ran by a husband and wife team who specialize in woodblock prints. According to their site “The Moon” is the largest print they have ever made, measuring in a 36×32″. Once the woodcarving is complete, the image will be hand printed on paper and sent out to those who were lucky enough to get a pre-order in with the shop. You can keep track of the carving process on the shop’s flickr page. What do you think of this duo’s take on art + science? We love it!

 

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on November 15th, 2012
 

Check out these remarkable photographs by Jason Tozer, a London-based photographer. With a special lighting technique he developed himself, Tozer manages to turn regular soap bubbles into stunning macro shots resembling something you would see in space. Via PetaPixel:

All of these bubbles are sitting on a wet ring. This gives me time to set the focus and size of the bubble, and manipluate the colours if I choose to. I blow down a straw to excite the surface of the bubble & spin the colour bands around. Occasionally a bubble will last much much longer than the others and it becomes increasingly clear as the colour bands move to the base. If I blow carefully on these, I can sometimes create the almost colourless textures, the more moon like ones.

I use household detergent with a little bit of glycerine in the mix. That helps with the lengevity of the bubble.

The project is appropriately titled “Bubbles”, which became a reality when Tozer was simply trying to test out a new camera. The photographer claims to use very little retouching on his work, so what you are seeing here is the authentic details and colours of the bubbles.

If you love this coupling of science + art, be sure to check out our DNA portraits!

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on October 16th, 2012
 

The Space Shuttle Challenger meets the Dodge Challenger, NASA’s Liberty Bell 7 meets Philly’s Liberty Bell, and the Viking Probe resembles Eric the Red. These are just a few “NASA Mashups” created by artist Doug Pedersen, in his 6 part series which matches NASA creations with their earthly equals. Via Wired:

Pedersen credits the inspiration for the series to a lifelong love of NASA and space exploration along with the resurgence of interest that surrounds Curiosity landing on Mars. “I had also just finished reading Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Space Chronicles and was probably inspired by that a bit”, he adds.

Though the overall concept is quite straightforward (pick a classic NASA spacecraft, combine it with another pop-culture icon that has the same name), Pedersen says that the devil is in the details. In particular, getting the text captions right for each diagram was tricky. “They had to be sort of funny yet relate to both the craft and pop-culture icon.” He nails it with MPG figures that include “earth orbit”, and mission objectives that add “Conquer”, “Burn”, and “Pillage” to the standard scientific fare.

Pedersen wanted to “give the pieces a feeling as though they’d been buried in some NASA file cabinet that no one had bothered to look through in decades”.  He added some aging effects and even graph lines to the artwork to give it this effect. We love his attention to detail, as well as his pairing of science + art in this project.

We’ve created a mashup of our own with genetics and art! Check out our DNA Portraits

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on September 20th, 2012
 

Side by side images of Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein

Yes, you read that right! Pictured above are two famous portraits that were re-created using a special photo-printing method that actually involves the use of E. coli bacteria. The method was developed by former microbiologist Zachary Copfer, who can now add artist to his list of talents. Via PetaPixel:

Here’s how Copfer’s method works: he first takes a supply of bacteria like E. coli, turns it into a fluorescent protein, and covers a plate with it … Next, he creates a “negative” of the photo he wants to print by covering the prepared plate with the photo and then exposing it to radiation. He then “develops” the image by having the bacteria grow, and finally “fixes” the image by coating the image with a layer of acrylic and resin.

Using this process, he creates images of things ranging from famous individuals to Hubble telescope photos of galaxies.

Side by side images of galaxy and close up of Albert Einstein

Do you love the mash up of biology and art as much as we do? Be sure to read up on Zachary’s method, and check out more of his genetically modified photos.

If you’re looking to create your own personal work of art, check out our unique portrait ideas that also combine science and art.

Header Image: Side by side bacteria prints of Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein via Gizmodo.
Galaxy image and Albert Einstein in a petri dish bacteria prints via PetaPixel.

 
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Posted in Art+Science, biotechnology, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on August 21st, 2012
 

We’re always on the lookout for cool DNA developments! Did you catch this story via Science Now?

When it comes to storing information, hard drives don’t hold a candle to DNA. Our genetic code packs billions of gigabytes into a single gram. A mere milligram of the molecule could encode the complete text of every book in the Library of Congress and have plenty of room to spare. All of this has been mostly theoretical—until now. In a new study, researchers stored an entire genetics textbook in less than a picogram of DNA—one trillionth of a gram—an advance that could revolutionize our ability to save data.

A few teams have tried to write data into the genomes of living cells. But the approach has a couple of disadvantages. First, cells die—not a good way to lose your term paper. They also replicate, introducing new mutations over time that can change the data.

To get around these problems, a team led by George Church, a synthetic biologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston, created a DNA information-archiving system that uses no cells at all. Instead, an inkjet printer embeds short fragments of chemically synthesized DNA onto the surface of a tiny glass chip. To encode a digital file, researchers divide it into tiny blocks of data and convert these data not into the 1s and 0s of typical digital storage media, but rather into DNA’s four-letter alphabet of As, Cs, Gs, and Ts. Each DNA fragment also contains a digital “barcode” that records its location in the original file. Reading the data requires a DNA sequencer and a computer to reassemble all of the fragments in order and convert them back into digital format. The computer also corrects for errors; each block of data is replicated thousands of times so that any chance glitch can be identified and fixed by comparing it to the other copies.

Read more…

Do you dig DNA as much as we do? Check out our DNA portraits, where art meets science.

Image: Scientists have found a way to store an entire textbook in the code of DNA. (John Goode/Flickr)

 
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Posted in Art+Science, DNA Art in the News, gift ideas, How it's Made, Just Cool by Courtney on August 2nd, 2012
 

What’s the best gift for the co-founder of Apple’s 62nd birthday? DNA Art from DNA 11, of course!

Steve Wozniak’s surprise birthday party was the hottest event in San Francisco last night. Woz spoke to the crowd alongside his present — the DNA Portrait we created for him. His DNA art was also transformed into a birthday cake thanks to our digital download feature.

How was Steve Wozniak’s DNA Portrait created? DNA 11 extracted his DNA from a simple cheek swab, then ran it through a gel and a process called electrophoresis in our lab. Smaller pieces of DNA move faster than larger pieces through the gel pores, so the result is a series of DNA strands separated from one another based on size, with the largest strands on the top of the gel and the smallest bands at the bottom. This process ensures the unique DNA extends into a unique order.

Fusion-io, where Woz is chief scientist, planned the surprise party. Guests secretly invited to the museum received pink boas, noise makers and a chance to test their skills on Tetris.

It was a real honor to create his portrait. Happy Birthday, Woz!

Photos via AllThingsD.com

 
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Posted in Art+Science by Adrian on June 26th, 2012
 

DNA Font

If DNA is art and typography is art then surely DNA can be typography right?

It seems so.

Scientists at Harvard Medical School developed a font made from strands of DNA. Each strand of DNA is folded into rectangular tiles that are then used like pixels to create letter and numbers.

The font was created to demonstrate how DNA could be fabricated into micro-structures for future application in nano-fabrication or drug delivery.

Of course the side benefit is now researchers have the ultimate way to pass notes back and forth.

The font is being dubbed DNA Sans or DNAlphabet but we prefer Hel-gattaca.

Check it out here: This Font Made Of DNA Isn’t Just For Kicks (via Fast Co.Design)

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool by Courtney on June 19th, 2012
 

Portraits come in all shapes and sizes, and New York artist Michael Mapes is a genius at capturing the essence of his subjects is a truly unique way. We love it when art meets science!
Via Colossal:

He creates elaborate specimen boxes by dissecting photographs and then compartmentalizing individual fragments within plastic bags, glass vials, magnifiers, in gelatin capsules and on insect pins. The boxes exist in an uncanny area between photography and sculpture, functioning both as portraits and as fascinating scientific canvases that make you question the the logic behind the organization of each piece.

Michael’s boxes feature thousands of individual specimens of dissected photographs and biographical DNA like hair, finger nails, scent, eye lashes, fingerprints, food, botanical elements, fabric swatches, makeup, dirt, handwriting samples and breath.

Learn more about Michael and his work in his interview with the Huffington Post.

Create your own unique portrait with DNA 11—turn your DNA, Fingerprint or Kiss into a work of art for your home.

 
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Posted in Art+Science, How it's Made by Courtney on June 15th, 2012
 

We’ve launched the world’s first creative laboratory combining genetics, art and commerce.

First, DNA 11 revolutionized the art world with our amazing  DNA Art—and now we’ve unveiled the world’s first genetics lab dedicated to the creation of biometric artwork: The Lab @ DNA 11.

We’ve been mixing Art+Science since 2005 — sequencing the individual DNA of customers and turning it into beautiful genetic art.

Now DNA 11 is creating the ultimate laboratory for the advancement of biometric artwork by combining a state-of-the-art genetics lab with the in-house creative team that dreamed up the original DNA Portrait to continue to revolutionize the industry.

“Establishing a genetics lab in the middle of an art factory exemplifies the essence of DNA 11 — the melding of the two worlds of art and genomics,” said Nazim Ahmed, cofounder, DNA 11.

Because the one-of-a-kind genetic art lab is completely in-house, we maintain total quality control and the ability to experiment with new ways of visualizing the building blocks of life.

“It’s our take on The Factory — Warhol’s famous midtown Manhattan studio — we call it The Lab @ DNA 11 and it provides an inspirational space for artists, creatives and scientists to create truly remarkable biometric inspired products,” said Nazim.

The Lab @ DNA 11 is located at the company’s global headquarters in Ottawa, Canada and provides support services for DNA art production around the globe including DNA 11’s U.S. production facility in Las Vegas, NV.

 
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Looking for corporate art? Create a photo canvas for your office: Visit our sister site CanvasPop.