Posts Tagged ‘DNA Art’
 
Posted in Art+Science, DNA Art, Science by Brittany on April 25th, 2014
 

To celebrate, we wanted to share some things you might not know about DNA!

And take 20% off artwork made from your DNA  - use the promo code DNADAY
(not combinable with other discounts or promotions, valid through April 27, 2014)

National DNA Day

 
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Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 29th, 2014
 

Typographic Desks

On our theme of typography this week, we’ve found another unique place to incorporate words and letters.

Discovered on Benoit Challand‘s portfolio, Fold Yard desks would be the perfect addition to any company’s office. Even if you aren’t involved with design, you can appreciate these typographic desks as an alternative to the regular cubicle lifestyle!

Your desk could be its own unique shape, plus be part of a curated layout – for instance a letter of the company name, or each employee’s initial. The possibilities are endless!

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

Typographic Desks

If you like unique design, check out DNA 11!

Via Web Urbanist

 
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Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week, Just Cool by Brittany on March 5th, 2014
 

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

Sleeping outside, under the starry skies, is something that many of us dream of doing. Although it is not always possible, for where can you lay peacefully and guarantee to see the beauty of the stars, let alone have appropriate temperatures to do so? Now there is a place to do so — in your bedroom!

The egg-shaped Cosmos Bed was designed by Natalia Rumyantseva and is still in prototype stage. Not only does it provide the illusion of sleeping beneath open skies, it is also equipped with a built-in audio system to play music, white-noise and your alarm in the morning. Plus, it has an aroma dispenser to provide you with therapeutic scents as you dream.

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

Inspirational Design of the Week: The Cosmos Bed

 

If you love unique products for your home, check out our wall art!

Via FastCo Design

 
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Posted in Cool Design of the Week, Home Decor, Just Cool by Brittany on March 1st, 2014
 

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

We’ve noticed a trend, and we’re quite fond it. Nothing is as sleek and geometrically intricate as origami — the Japanese art of paper folding — so how could you go wrong with a design based on it? We’ve noticed a lot of origami inspired products and designs lately so we rounded up a few of our favourites to admire and praise.

1) The Origami Bench

5 Origami Inspired Designs

Created by blackLAB architects, this bench combines clean white with exposed wood and metal. Plus it folds and creases as seamlessly as paper.

2) Make Kiosks

5 Origami Inspired Designs

Make Architects created these kiosks based on the efficient and functional concept of folding paper. They open to reveal the kiosk inside and close to become sculpture-like when not in use.

3) Kafolda: a Fold-it-Yourself Spoon

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

This spoon is mailed to you flat. You are in charge of folding it into the perfect shape — with crisp corners to reach right to the edges of a flat container.

4) Klemens Torggler Doors

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

These doors fold and rotate to open and close, looking as light as paper.

5) Folded Tones Rug

5 Origami-Inspired Designs

This rug does not actually fold or bend like origami, but it sure looks like it does. An optical illusion for your floor!

Let us know which one of our 5 Origami-Inspired Designs you like best in the comments!
If you’re looking for  unique designs to decorate your home, check out our DNA Art! 

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool, Photography by Brittany on February 27th, 2014
 

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

It’s no surprise that we enjoy the combination of science and art  and these images by Fabian Oefner are exactly that. Oefner comes from an art and design background but has always been interested in science. His images generally depict a scientific concept, however you don’t need to know the scientific background to see the beauty in his images.

As he explains in his TED talk the goal of his work is to speak to the viewer’s heart as well as their brain. For instance, the image above is created with ferrofluid which is a magnetic substance. After placing a magnet beneath the fluid and adding watercolor paint to the substance you can see the patterns and shapes begin to form. You don’t need to know that ferrofluid is hydrophobic (it won’t mix with water) to see that this image is stunning, but when you do know that the details in the image become much more evident.

Check out a few of his other images below to see the many ways science and art can collide.

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

Photographer Fabian Oefner Combines Science and Art

If you love science check out our DNA Art! 

Via TED Blog

 

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool by Brittany on February 20th, 2014
 

Calvin Seibert Creates Geometric Sand Castles

These sand castles – if you can call them simply that – are so detailed they look like architectural models. The precision and detail involved in the angles and edges of these sand sculptures is unlike anything we’ve seen.

When you see some of artist Calvin Seibert‘s other sand creations you won’t be surprised to learn that he is also a sculptor and carpenter. Seibert explains on his Flickr page that he doesn’t plan the castles beforehand, once he begins he “can start to see where things are going and either follow that road or attempt to contradict it with something unexpected.”

Calvin Seibert Creates Geometric Sand Castles

Calvin Seibert Creates Geometric Sand Castles

Calvin Seibert Creates Geometric Sand Castles

If you’re a fan of geometric shapes and architecture, you might enjoy following us on Pinterest!
Or check out our DNA Art.

Via Colossal

 
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Posted in DNA Art, Inspiration, Just Cool, Technology by Brittany on January 30th, 2014
 

Artistic Technology: YrWall is an Electronic Graffiti Wall (as seen on Dragon's Den)

Have you ever wanted to paint like a graffiti artist, without making a mess or getting into trouble? Then check out YrWall! This digital graffiti wall allows you to hold a realistic “spray can” to choose your colors, aim and paint away.

When YrWall was first sprung on BBC’s Dragon’s Den a few years ago the artistic innovation reminded us of our DNA Art. Inventors Tim Williams and Tom Hogan ended up striking a deal with two of the dragons on the show to earn funding for their idea. The YrWall is now fully functional, available for rent and is being used in awesome ways.

The wall is available for rent on Luma’s website, and can be set up at your events for your guests to interact with. The easy-to-use graffiti wall makes for a great idea board, brand or logo platform, or just a place for your guests to unleash their inner artist!

Artistic Technology: YrWall is an Electronic Graffiti Wall (as seen on Dragon's Den)

Artistic Technology: YrWall is a Digital Graffiti Wall (as seen on Dragon's Den)

Artistic Technology: YrWall is an Electronic Graffiti Wall (as seen on Dragon's Den)

Share our love of unique art? Check out our DNA Portraits! 

Images via Luma

 
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Posted in Art+Science, biotechnology, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on August 21st, 2012
 

We’re always on the lookout for cool DNA developments! Did you catch this story via Science Now?

When it comes to storing information, hard drives don’t hold a candle to DNA. Our genetic code packs billions of gigabytes into a single gram. A mere milligram of the molecule could encode the complete text of every book in the Library of Congress and have plenty of room to spare. All of this has been mostly theoretical—until now. In a new study, researchers stored an entire genetics textbook in less than a picogram of DNA—one trillionth of a gram—an advance that could revolutionize our ability to save data.

A few teams have tried to write data into the genomes of living cells. But the approach has a couple of disadvantages. First, cells die—not a good way to lose your term paper. They also replicate, introducing new mutations over time that can change the data.

To get around these problems, a team led by George Church, a synthetic biologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston, created a DNA information-archiving system that uses no cells at all. Instead, an inkjet printer embeds short fragments of chemically synthesized DNA onto the surface of a tiny glass chip. To encode a digital file, researchers divide it into tiny blocks of data and convert these data not into the 1s and 0s of typical digital storage media, but rather into DNA’s four-letter alphabet of As, Cs, Gs, and Ts. Each DNA fragment also contains a digital “barcode” that records its location in the original file. Reading the data requires a DNA sequencer and a computer to reassemble all of the fragments in order and convert them back into digital format. The computer also corrects for errors; each block of data is replicated thousands of times so that any chance glitch can be identified and fixed by comparing it to the other copies.

Read more…

Do you dig DNA as much as we do? Check out our DNA portraits, where art meets science.

Image: Scientists have found a way to store an entire textbook in the code of DNA. (John Goode/Flickr)

 
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Posted in Cool Art Ideas, Cool Design of the Week, How it's Made by Courtney on July 20th, 2012
 

Image of wine Cork Portraits by Scott Gundersen

We’re always on the lookout for unique art and cool portraits, so when we found these Wine Cork Portraits by Scott Gundersen we got really excited. Via Colossal:

Starting with a large photograph that’s transferred to a drawing, Gundersen pins each cork to the canvas, creating a correlation between the hues of the wine-stained corks and the value of light or shadow in the portrait. His latest work, Trisha, took 3,621 corks to complete, but other works have required over 9,000.

If you’re not already blow away by this art’s immensity, check out the video below to catch a peak at how it all comes together. Meet: “Grace”:

 
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Posted in Art+Science, How it's Made by Courtney on June 15th, 2012
 

We’ve launched the world’s first creative laboratory combining genetics, art and commerce.

First, DNA 11 revolutionized the art world with our amazing  DNA Art—and now we’ve unveiled the world’s first genetics lab dedicated to the creation of biometric artwork: The Lab @ DNA 11.

We’ve been mixing Art+Science since 2005 — sequencing the individual DNA of customers and turning it into beautiful genetic art.

Now DNA 11 is creating the ultimate laboratory for the advancement of biometric artwork by combining a state-of-the-art genetics lab with the in-house creative team that dreamed up the original DNA Portrait to continue to revolutionize the industry.

“Establishing a genetics lab in the middle of an art factory exemplifies the essence of DNA 11 — the melding of the two worlds of art and genomics,” said Nazim Ahmed, cofounder, DNA 11.

Because the one-of-a-kind genetic art lab is completely in-house, we maintain total quality control and the ability to experiment with new ways of visualizing the building blocks of life.

“It’s our take on The Factory — Warhol’s famous midtown Manhattan studio — we call it The Lab @ DNA 11 and it provides an inspirational space for artists, creatives and scientists to create truly remarkable biometric inspired products,” said Nazim.

The Lab @ DNA 11 is located at the company’s global headquarters in Ottawa, Canada and provides support services for DNA art production around the globe including DNA 11’s U.S. production facility in Las Vegas, NV.

 
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Looking for corporate art? Create a photo canvas for your office: Visit our sister site CanvasPop.