Posts Tagged ‘Science and Art’
 
Posted in Art+Science, Cool Design of the Week, Inspirational Design of the Week by Brittany on January 9th, 2015
 

Ambio

We’ve looked at bioluminescence before — the way it naturally occurs in the ocean as light-emitting microorganisms. That is why we know that these organisms glow occurs when they are under stress, moving or agitated.

Dutch designer Teresa van Dongen found a way to harness this light within an actual lamp.

Still in its concept stages, the light hangs from the ceiling with the help of a counterbalance. The glass tube is filled with artificial seawater and bioluminescent bacteria. When the light is pushed, the bacteria become agitated and oxygen is introduced into their environment causing them to glow. Van Dongen says the light will swing for about 20 minutes before needing to be moved again.

There are still a few hitches with the project such as the lifespan of the bacteria (currently only about 2 days), but van Dongen is hopeful about the ability to create our own light from these organisms, a fairly sustainable option.

Check out the video posted by Dezeen to learn more.

Ambio

Ambio

Ambio

Via Dezeen

 
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Posted in Art+Science, How it's Made, Just Cool, Science by Brittany on May 27th, 2014
 

We’ve always highlighted works of art that collide with the world of science — this work takes that collision to a whole new level.

These portraits are made from disease-causing bacteria. Artist/Scientist Zachary Copfer used different types of bacteria for the different portraits, including that which causes respiratory infections and even some from his own body!

The portraits themselves are quite impressive, outside of the medium used to create them. The way Copfer exposes the bacteria to radiation in order to accelerate their growth causes a Lichtenstein appearance in the work as well — the spots of bacteria resembling the comic book style Lichtenstein was known for.

The other thing about creating art from bacteria is that these cells are living things, which means they will eventually die. These works of art are mortal beings.

Wow.

Love science and art? Check out DNA 11! 

Via Beautiful/Decay

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Photography, Science by Brittany on April 1st, 2014
 

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

We are always fascinated by artistic studies that investigate the science behind humans. This photographic series does just that.

Photographer Gao Rongguo took photographs of 50-year-old twins standing face-to-face, to show the similarities and differences of how we age. From their physical features, to the differences in their hair styles and wardrobe, these photos provide a contrasting look at the way life changes people.

As if looking into a mirror, Rongguo says the portraits were set up to show how “He/she used to have the same face, living in the same family, but their lives changed due to various reasons after growing up.”

Take a look at some more twins below!

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Photographs of 50-Year-Old Identical Twins Show How We Age

Via Mashable  

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Photography, Science by Brittany on March 25th, 2014
 

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

No matter what you put under a microscope, it’s going to look a little strange. From something as simple as a lily (above) to something as in-depth as the wiring of the human brain, microscopic photographs let us see the colors, textures, pores and bumps that we can’t see with our own eyes alone. And it is eerily fascinating.

The Wellcome Image Awards are a competition for just such photos, and we have some of the winners for you to take a look at here. A lot of the images were taken using a technique called Electron Microscopy. This is a process to capture an image with a beam of electrons, rather than a beam of light. The electrons interact with the subject to create the image we see in the end.

Some other techniques used in creating these images include X-ray projection, light micrographs and standard photography, among others.

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Wiring of a Human Brain

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Nit on Human Hair

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Bat

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Vitamin C Crystals

Microscopic Images: Eerily Fascinating

Plant Reproductive Parts

Something else you can’t see with your own eyes alone is how awesome our human DNA is! Check out our DNA Portraits to see the art you can create from your own science.

Via Wired Science

 
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Posted in Art in Nature, Art+Science, Photography by Brittany on March 22nd, 2014
 

Ice Typography

We are big fans of typography (don’t believe us? Just check out our Pinterest account).

If you’re with us on that, you’ll love this ice typography by Nicole Dextras! It is exactly what you think, words written with letters made from ice. What makes it extra cool is that the words suit the locations, and the locations range from the Yukon River to downtown Toronto.

As well, the letters are 3D, different colors, and vary in size from 8 feet tall to 18 inches tall. Visit her website to learn more about the process she took to create her typography!

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

Ice Typography

If you love the combination of nature, science, and art, you may want to check out our art — created from your DNA!

Via Design Collector

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Cool Art Ideas, Just Cool by Courtney on January 3rd, 2014
 

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

When art and science collide, it’s a beautiful thing! We are intrigued by these stunning photos captured by Washington-based photographer Angela Kelly. The photo series is titled “Frozen in a Bubble”, and gives you an up-close look at soap bubbles as they freeze in -9°c weather.

Kelly got the idea when she took her son outside to blow bubbles, made using a simple solution of dish soap, karo syrup, and water. She says, “we blew the bubbles across the top of our frozen patio table and also upon the hood of my car and then we watched in awe as each individual bubble froze with their own unique patterns”. We absolutely love the results! What do you think? Share with us in the comments!

Looking to create some unique art of your own? Check out our DNA portraits!

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela Kelly

Beautiful Photos of Soap Bubbles Freezing by Angela KellyVia Demilked

 

 
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