Posts Tagged ‘Science art’
 
Posted in Art+Science, Science by Brittany on February 4th, 2014
 

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At first glance, you would never think that these images have anything to do with science. But as we know, art and science can create some really amazing creative works!

These images in particular are microscopic views of diatoms – or algae – from the California Academy of Sciences. These images surfaced when a group of hobbyists arranged the diatoms into visually stunning patterns and positions. This is an incredible feat, considering that diatoms are some of the smallest organisms on earth. The designs that we see here would not be available to us without the help of a microscope.

Check out more of these fantastic images on photographer Sara Mansfield’s Flickr.

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If you want to make your own scientific art, check out our DNA Portraits! 

Via Colossal

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on November 15th, 2012
 

Check out these remarkable photographs by Jason Tozer, a London-based photographer. With a special lighting technique he developed himself, Tozer manages to turn regular soap bubbles into stunning macro shots resembling something you would see in space. Via PetaPixel:

All of these bubbles are sitting on a wet ring. This gives me time to set the focus and size of the bubble, and manipluate the colours if I choose to. I blow down a straw to excite the surface of the bubble & spin the colour bands around. Occasionally a bubble will last much much longer than the others and it becomes increasingly clear as the colour bands move to the base. If I blow carefully on these, I can sometimes create the almost colourless textures, the more moon like ones.

I use household detergent with a little bit of glycerine in the mix. That helps with the lengevity of the bubble.

The project is appropriately titled “Bubbles”, which became a reality when Tozer was simply trying to test out a new camera. The photographer claims to use very little retouching on his work, so what you are seeing here is the authentic details and colours of the bubbles.

If you love this coupling of science + art, be sure to check out our DNA portraits!

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on October 16th, 2012
 

The Space Shuttle Challenger meets the Dodge Challenger, NASA’s Liberty Bell 7 meets Philly’s Liberty Bell, and the Viking Probe resembles Eric the Red. These are just a few “NASA Mashups” created by artist Doug Pedersen, in his 6 part series which matches NASA creations with their earthly equals. Via Wired:

Pedersen credits the inspiration for the series to a lifelong love of NASA and space exploration along with the resurgence of interest that surrounds Curiosity landing on Mars. “I had also just finished reading Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Space Chronicles and was probably inspired by that a bit”, he adds.

Though the overall concept is quite straightforward (pick a classic NASA spacecraft, combine it with another pop-culture icon that has the same name), Pedersen says that the devil is in the details. In particular, getting the text captions right for each diagram was tricky. “They had to be sort of funny yet relate to both the craft and pop-culture icon.” He nails it with MPG figures that include “earth orbit”, and mission objectives that add “Conquer”, “Burn”, and “Pillage” to the standard scientific fare.

Pedersen wanted to “give the pieces a feeling as though they’d been buried in some NASA file cabinet that no one had bothered to look through in decades”.  He added some aging effects and even graph lines to the artwork to give it this effect. We love his attention to detail, as well as his pairing of science + art in this project.

We’ve created a mashup of our own with genetics and art! Check out our DNA Portraits

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Just Cool, Science by Courtney on September 20th, 2012
 

Side by side images of Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein

Yes, you read that right! Pictured above are two famous portraits that were re-created using a special photo-printing method that actually involves the use of E. coli bacteria. The method was developed by former microbiologist Zachary Copfer, who can now add artist to his list of talents. Via PetaPixel:

Here’s how Copfer’s method works: he first takes a supply of bacteria like E. coli, turns it into a fluorescent protein, and covers a plate with it … Next, he creates a “negative” of the photo he wants to print by covering the prepared plate with the photo and then exposing it to radiation. He then “develops” the image by having the bacteria grow, and finally “fixes” the image by coating the image with a layer of acrylic and resin.

Using this process, he creates images of things ranging from famous individuals to Hubble telescope photos of galaxies.

Side by side images of galaxy and close up of Albert Einstein

Do you love the mash up of biology and art as much as we do? Be sure to read up on Zachary’s method, and check out more of his genetically modified photos.

If you’re looking to create your own personal work of art, check out our unique portrait ideas that also combine science and art.

Header Image: Side by side bacteria prints of Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein via Gizmodo.
Galaxy image and Albert Einstein in a petri dish bacteria prints via PetaPixel.

 
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Posted in Art+Science, Science by Courtney on February 3rd, 2012
 


Science in itself is captivating and we love science as art, but these photos from the 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge really drew us in.

Contest judges made their picks based on visual impact, originality and clarity. The winners, which include “people’s choice” awards as well as honorable mentions, were published online Feb. 2 in the journal Science. Here are some of our favorites via Wired Science:

Mouse Eyeball Cells (above)
Researchers stained ultra-thin slices of a mouse’s eye to create this first-place photography winner. The stain was made of three antibodies that bind to three different molecules present in all cells, but in differing concentrations.
Image: Bryan William Jones/University of Utah/Moran Eye Center 

Breast Cancer Cells
In this illustration, breast cancer cells bear tentacle-like projections. An antibody designed to combat breast cancer, called TRA-8, floats in the foreground (green blobs). It earned an honourable mention.

Image: Emiko Paul/Quade Paul/Echo Medical Media/Ron Gamble/UAB Insight 

 

 

 

 

Cucumber Skin Barbs
Under 800X magnification, this honorable-mention-winning photograph shows toxin-filled barbs called trichomes on the skin of an immature cucumber. The trichomes bear sharp points to help protect the growing fruit from predators.

Image: Dr. Robert Rock Bellivea

 

 
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